Hiking

Hiking: Quebec Run Wild Area

Hemlocks hanging on to the bankToday I went hiking with George in the Quebec Run Wild Area in Fayette county. I had been meaning to hit this trail area for a couple of years now, but time passed, now I wish I had gone there sooner. Hopefully I’ll have time to hike and camp this area again before we move to England.

At first we thought we had covered about eight miles, but George noted her GPS had cut out for a bit of time in there and it’s more likely that we hiked closer to nine miles. Not a small chunk of distance covered. The trails took us along Quebec Run under a dark canopy of hemlock and mountain laurels and through more open and light areas of maples. It was interesting to see on the drive in just how much further behind the trees are on the ridges, most were just starting to bud, giving pastel highlights in sharp contrast to the dark barks.

Bear TrapAt one point we needed to cross an access road to continue on the trail we were on. We encountered a couple of trucks and DCNR folk on the grassy road. “Did you see a bear?” the ranger asked, “because we just released one here about fifteen minutes ago,” he explained, “well, if you see one, just clap your hands and make a lot of noise to chase him off. We do have a lot of bears in this area.”

Stream from bridgeWith so much rain recently, many of the trails had turned into tiny tributaries to the tributaries. I was thinking we should have taken a picture each time we needed to cross water to keep track. Either by bridge, logs, stones, squishy leaves, muck, jumping, or simply finding higher ground for an alternate route around the blazed trail turned stream, I imagine the number is well over fifty.

Trails were streams after all the rainOne of the trails turned stream, note the blue blaze and George navigating around it.

Some of the wildlife highlights: Scarlet Tanager, Yellow Swallowtail, Lady Slipper:

Scarlet Tanager Yellow swallowtail Lady slipper

Click for Quebec Run Photo Set

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Hiking: Keystone State Park

I hit the trails with Judith today at Keystone State Park. Another well maintained set of trails that interconnected enough to give us options to explore. We hopped on the first blaze color we encountered, yellow, and had an interlude with the blue blazed trail, which found us exiting about an hour later. This wasn’t enough, we evaluated the map, saw there was an orange blazed trail further out that we had managed not to see. We headed out in search of said trail.

Judith with We found an outer loop of the yellow trail, another unexplored branch of the blue blazed trail… finally we took a turn and realized we were no longer on a blazed trail but continued on. We found ourselves in some wetlands underneath power lines. Power lines? Where did I see that on the map? Oh yeah. We are WAY off course. But in the spirit of exploration, forged on up the hill (which Judith so named Maud) under the power lines. We thought if we could reach the road we would easily reorient ourselves in the right direction. We saw a road, but could not reach it.

Tee-pee skeletonWe turned off onto a small side trail, shortly into the woods we happened across the wooden skeleton of a tee-pee and a couple make shift shelter structures. We hypothesized we were hiking in above the campgrounds, that maybe this was a boy scout site for more primitive camping excursions. We continued on until we reached someone’s large back yard. Hrm. Turn around.

WetlandsSomewhere along the way we really led ourselves astray as the “trail” we were on continued to diminish until the point where we were bush whacking our way along a stream. If we followed the water, we theorized, we could find our way back to the wetlands where the unblazed trail led us into.

To make an already long story shorter, we backtracked and bush whacked the best we could only to emerge from the woods onto a portion of the original yellow blazed trail we had taken in.

Fish Formation SwimmingThree hours later we emerged, only a little scratched up, victorious from the days adventure. We had a precarious bridge to cross, observed interesting fish formation swimming, swarms of butterflies and skippers, bee-flys, and the emerald green cicindelids out in force.

I had left the GPS with Mark (he had planned on a long ride today), so I estimate between six to seven miles were covered. Today would have been a really good day to have the GPS with us.

Close up of Cicindelid Juvenal's Duskywing

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Hiking: Boyce Park

SaucyThe park map illustrating the hiking trails is quite misleading for Boyce Park. There is one large loop on one side of the map, this must mean, “many inter-looping trails here.” These were easy well maintained groomed trails that meandered nicely. It is much easier to find the trail head near the log home than it is from the main entrance road, I would normally have just hopped onto the cross country skiing trail and been happy. Mark joined me for this after work relatively short two mile hike.

Deb in sun

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Hiking: Raccoon Creek State Park

Gray Comma butterfly

Amazing perfect day for a hike at Racoon Creek State Park with Judith. I did not bring the GPS, but I estimate between 4-5 miles were covered. I have posted many photos of the wildflowers in bloom, the sea of skunk cabbage, the forest floor carpeted in tiny flowers. Above, a Gray Comma butterfly (or at the very least a species of Polygonia).

This camera makes it hard *not* to take fabulous photos.

Mushrooms, White Trout Lily and Toadshade:

Mushrooms! White trout lily
Toadshade

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The Title of the Shot Says it All

“Denoviches Being Weird” by Geis

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Hiking: Deer Lakes Park

Or I should really say, “hiking” (imagine me miming quotation marks with my fingers as I say that). It was so sunny and nice out today, we wanted to go on a hike. But since we were limited on time by friends who wanted to join us, but couldn’t until later, we didn’t get out until close to 4:30. We also needed to find a close enough park to have enough time outside, we settled on Deer Lakes Park.

Deb with treeWe walked around two of the small lakes, on the GPS our path is a small infinity sign. The ambling 0.9 mile walk over the slick muddy ground was punctuated frequently for photography stops and for skipping stones over the thin layer of ice still on the surface of the water on one end of the lake, some of the stones landing neatly on the surface. Standing still, we could see the wind slowly moving the entire sheet of ice. We stopped to visit with the Canada geese and Mallard ducks who eagerly swam to our end of the lake hoping for a snack, which we didn’t have anything to offer. The empty boxes of saltines and bread wrappers in the garbage nearby tells me why they were looking at us so expectantly. There was also a Kingfisher keeping us company twittering and skimming over the water’s surface.

Even though it was a short walk, it was still nice to get outside.

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Hiking: Riverview Park

I joined Robyn on this hike that she rallied the troops to. It was a led hike organized through Venture Outdoors from the Geology of City Parks series, led by a Carnegie Museum staff member. I like the group, I’ve met and hashed with one of the few staffers of the organization and was asked if I wanted to be a group leader and organize themed hikes in the area. An interesting proposition, yes, but they are generally voluntary positions.

Starting at the highest point in the park, we hiked down through time, stopping for discussion about the outcrops and interesting geologic features we reached. I’ve studied quite a bit of geology and even took a paleontology course, so the general information on geologic history and fossils of the area presented was nothing new. Information on the area’s sedimentation and stratification, as in the exact names, composition and time scales of deposition, was new to me and fascinating.

Although the weather was in the low twenties with a light coating of snow, it turned out to be a gorgeous day for a hike with the sun shining warmly upon us through the chilly breeze. Dressing appropriately with non-cotton layers and a light outer shell jacket and cozy wool socks makes hiking in weather like this a delight.

Something is not quite right with my GPS record of this hike. A slow leisurely three hour hike with many stops should not equal the 10.7 miles it says the clearly marked and way pointed loop is. We would have had to been moving at a pretty good clip** given the terrain if that were the case. It was more like a four mile hike looking at the scale of the park. I still can’t quite tell what went wrong with the device, if it picked up on some part of my drive, which it shouldn’t have since it was turned off, who knows. It’s something I’ll have to pay careful attention to on the next hike.

**From my hiking experience I can tell you that hiking over a moderately clear and even path walking at a brisk pace I cover a mile in twenty minutes.

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Fallingwater

I finally made a trip to Fallingwater. I’ve only been meaning to go for the last couple of decades :)

We (Karen, Jill, Ted and I) couldn’t have asked for a more perfect day, a warm sun shiny day, lots of lovely fall foliage, a tasty lunch in the cafe. Unfortunately, the 20 miles of hiking trails were closed due to the snow last week. Since most of the trees still had their leaves, there was enough snow to cause many heavy limbs to fall. I would like to return, so next time there will be hiking involved.

I will have to say, that is a house I could be comfortable living in ;)

We were not permitted to take photos of the inside of the house, but could take some of the exterior:



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Hiking: Cook Forest

I went to Cook Forest today with George where we hiked two circular trails. We lucked out with the weather, we encountered rain on the drive up and on the return trip. But during the hours of hiking we were periodically greeted with rays of sunlight pouring through the canopy and remained dry for the duration of our hike.

The first loop was about four miles, two of which were seemingly straight up hill. The paths led us through the Old Growth portion referred to as the “Forest Cathedral.” This is a deserved name for a temple of towering old hemlocks. I have been in a few pockets of Old Growth forest in our state before, but none so large. The trees towered over our heads with such presence, it is clear it could be some place sacred. If I were to choose, this would be my place of atheist worship.

The second loop was a small (a little over two miles) circular trail that led us through the stands of Old Growth White Pines. A species and a forest much more reminiscent of what is seen in Eastern parts of the state. The trails and under-story were open and soft with thick layers of pine needles. As per usual, there were bugs and frogs and mushrooms to pick up and poke at. I am apparently gaining the reputation of touching everything and everything that most people consider disgusting. Rooting around in dirt and under rocks for beetles, getting urinated on by a toad I was holding and poking at fungus all fit into that category.

This is another area I intend to return to, hopefully soon.

See George’s site for the GPS map and vertical profile, an excellent way to visualize what the hike was like. I need to start bringing my GPS unit along and start a similar image log of the hiking I do.

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Hiking: Wolf Rocks

Went to Wolf Rocks near Forbes State Forest for a quite nice five mile loop hike with George. The trail, although riddled with large rocks which promoted stumbling if you weren’t paying attention, was open and well maintained. There was even amazingly prominent signage. We were able to maintain a fairly brisk pace due to the nature of the trail. With a stop to hang out on the sand stone boulders overlooking Linn Run and Forbes State Forest, we made the round trip in a little over two hours.

The under story was a mosaic of seas of emerald green ferns in deer defoliated glory and dense patches of pines, mountain laurel and rhododendron where you couldn’t see very far into the woods. Pennsylvania woods can be quite breath taking.

There was a large piece of garbage left on a rock near the boulders, I went over, meaning to pack it out. I was surprised to see it was a ziplock bag with a tupper-ware-esque container in it with the message to the effect of, “Congratulations, you found a letter box (?) please do not remove” (letterboxing.org). So we left a message in the box and let it remain in situ in similar style to geocaching.

This was such a nice walk in the woods that I would like to go to this area again soon. The thing to do next time is to pack a lunch and eat on top of the boulders overlooking the forested rolling hills and the valley below. Plus there are heaps of other well marked trails in both of the nearby State Forest and Park lands that I’m sure are well worth exploring.

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GMap Pedometer

For general reference, for those of us who like to map out and know distances of our walking, running, hiking, whatever routes Google Map Pedometer is a cool tool.

You can pull up a map of your neighborhood, connect points along the route you walk and it will give you the distance and if you enter your weight it also calculates the number of calories burned.

A favorite walking loop of mine, which I just came from a brisk stroll in this dark and misty night, is 2.12 miles around the streets of my neighborhood.

link c/o Mark’s del.icio.us page

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Hiking: Frick Park Fitness Trail

Again, counting the fitness trail as hiking as it forces you to use all sorts of muscle groups jogging or walking between stations where you stop to do some crazy exercise.

We (witcheypoojr, rainhag and I) were supposed to do this trail tomorrow, but scheduling conflicts conflicted, so we went today. Had I known earlier this morning, I would have saved the five mile bike ride I rode for tomorrow. But alas, today I’m kicking ass. Tomorrow, probably not so much.

We walked the first loop to see where the trail actually went and what the stations were. In this way we wouldn’t have to stop too long to figure out what we were supposed to do and keep heart rates up. It was a brisk walk around. It was a good thing we did this, as some of the stations were either lacking the equipment or lacking the explanation. In either of those cases we made up an exercise to do. We then jogged and walked and (even ran a leg) the second time around.

Each lap was one mile, plus a little back tracking looking for stations in the intial walk through. A little more than two miles in a little less than an hour.

And unfortunately, there is no convenient website listing the locations of all of these fitness trails in the area. There’s rumored to be one in South Park as well as Fox Chapel. We plan to investigate these claims.

The other bonus of this park, The Big Blue Slide.

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Hiking: Bellevue Fitness Trail

Hey, it still counts toward my hiking since it forces you to use all sorts of muscle groups and maintain your heart rate. This is one of those trails where you jog, run or walk between stations that then have you do some crazy exercise.

Noted that I need upper body work. Although I can muster a few pull ups and carry myself across monkey bars and lift my weight for other various strange tasks, it is clear I need upper body strength training. Went through the course with witcheypoojr and rainhag. The first time jogging and doing the exercises and a second time walking around and examining our weaknesses on the various exercises, noting what we need to work on and how to modify others to be more effective for our strength levels. Only 1.2 miles but an excellent cardio workout.

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Hiking: Rachel Carson Trail

Had a nice three mile walk with George today, the theme: We don’t need no stinking trail maps! And we don’t need no stinking trail either!

The idea was to head out to the Rachel Carson Trail and hike a couple miles, and turn around and head home. Since I had little luck finding trail mapage on line, I thought a stop at the Carson Homestead would be conducive to finding someone who had a better idea as to the location of the trail head.

A gaggle of friendly and chatty women who volunteer at the homestead directed us to where we needed to go, “did you bring your machetes?” they started off with, “you’ll start out following a chain link fence around a soccer field at the end of the road. You will be thinking, ‘this certainly can’t possibly be right,’ but that’s where you go.”

They went on to explain the plight of neglected trail maintenance, that apparently the group that used to keep the trail well maintained (and provided maps) no longer does so and the current group is not so fastidious in these endeavors. Once we found the “trail”, we apparently had the option of going one way for five miles or off in the other direction for the other thirty miles.

I suppose we were briefly on the actual trail, an open causeway underneath towering power-lines. Not the picturesque description I encountered earlier while researching the trail of “scenic vistas of the Allegheny River.” With no shade or cover from sun, this was hardly the pleasant walk in the woods I had envisioned, so off we went, off trail, into the woods, along a stream, along a road, back up through more woods, back to a road, past the scenic power plant and up under the power lines again and back into the woods. We muscled this linear trail circular.

Apparently, if we start the hike on the other end it’s a bit more well marked and maintained. I want to give this trail the benefit of the doubt. If the majority of this trail involves following power-lines/pipelines, that would be unfortunate, but I would be willing to give it an early morning or late afternoon (read: not under the blazing sun with no cover to speak of on a 90 degree day).

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Hiking: Raccoon Creek

Went for a delightful walk in the woods with Tom last night in Raccoon Creek State Park. We covered a lot of ground in the three and a half hours we were out there, we’re estimating 5-6 miles of walking. It’s convenient that there are so many circular trails or that so many of the 44 miles of trails intersect we were able to make it back to the car right before sun down.

I broke from tradition, the tradition Suzanne and I had started years ago of finding a local greasy spoon of a diner for a well deserved piece of after hike pie. But chatting over salads and wine seems like a fine way to cap off a day after a nice walk. I was scary tired and didn’t want to drive (I volunteered to drive as I am still in the honeymoon phase of having my driver license), scary tired, but a good kind of tired. We talked and gossiped alot, shared some wine and made silly phone calls to mutual friends.

I need to hike more, I have not been out on a hike since February and before then not since the previous year’s field season. Getting out into green spaces does wonders for my psyche, as does the physical activity for both mind and body. I was a good kind of tired at the end of the day and slept better than I have in recent days (weeks?) and could easily turn my brain off to sleep soundly.

This little excursion was so good for me, it’s exactly what I needed, this hike, on this day, this conversation, with this friend.

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Yosemite

Photos to soon follow suit, although no picture could truly capture the enormity of the mountains and water falls nor the vast size of the densely packed conifer forest.

We had the convertible for this trip, winding through the desert and chaparral, up the foot hills on twisty roads that seemed impossibly carved into the hillsides. In my sunglasses and scarf wrapped around my head to hold my golden hair in place, basking in the heat with the wind whipping by, nothing could smack more of California.

As we approached the park the air cooled noticeably as we climbed in elevation. The sun beating down was still hot, but there was a pleasant chill to the air.

Vernal Falls, Yosemite National ParkWe hiked up the steep and narrow granite paths to Vernal Falls. Mark was much braver than I and climbed out to the edge to feel the full force of the wind produced by the crashing cascading water. He’s standing on the rocks in the first picture with his arms spread wide:

Much to my surprise the hike down did little for my knees! It wasn�t a very long hike, just steep and on hard substrate, normally my knees don�t complain until after I�ve hiked eleven miles or so. They�re fine now.

We cruised through the mountains and passed by dense forests, admired the power of fire ecology as we found ourselves surrounded by recently burned forest with it�s rapidly recovering under growth. Natural reclamation is a wondrous thing, it is stunning how quickly vegetation takes over.

P7210418.jpgWe found ourselves in the Mariposa Grove of Giant Sequoias, a grove of about 500 Sierra Redwoods (not to be confused with the Coast Redwoods). In the interest of time, we only hiked a short way into this grove of towering giants, humbled by their sheer size and age. They reminded me of the National Registry of Big Trees. Certainly one in this grove qualifies.

We wanted to reach Glacier Point for the sunset, the drive through the mountains as dusk approached was spectacular beyond words. We reached the point shortly after the sun had set; we were still rewarded with a magnificent view! (this shot was after sunset with a 16 second exposure time:)

We started to wind our way back down the mountains, at around 5000 feet and in total darkness we paused on the side of the road under the clear skies. A convertible makes a fantastic platform for star gazing! Our seats leaned back we were in store for a breathtaking show of sparkling stars, the gauzy veil of the Milky Way delicately gracing the sky, even a shooting star, a magical way to end our day!

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Hiking: Raccoon Creek State Park

Hike length: 8.3 miles

Suzanne and I decided we were going to try to hit this wild flower trail at least once a month this season and keep our own records of which species were in bloom. The park rangers at this state park will label plants in the woods along the marked trails that are in bloom with scientific and common names. It’s our
goal to learn all of the common wild flowers to Pennsylvania.

Wild flowers in bloom along trail:
-Wild blue phlox
-Virginia blue bells
-Trillium
-Squaw root
-Wild geranium
-Purple larkspur
-Violets (purple and whit)
-Forget-me-nots
-Swamp buttercups
-Purple ground ivy
-Wild columbine
-Jack-in-the-pulpits

In our tradition of stopping for pie and coffee after a good long hike, we went to the Janowski Farm’s diner… mmmm… pie…

Note: Suzanne ended up moving away from Pgh and we were unable to continue our flower education

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Hiking: M. K. Goddard State Park

a.k.a. Lake Wilhelm hike

Hike length: 13 miles , you hike all the way around the lake!

This was a long, long hike, which took us a good seven hours to complete. The first half, and it is nearly equal lengths on each side of this narrow long lake, was very low key. Wide paths clearly marked, ambling gentle rolling hills, taking us through and along side farm fields, quaint cabins and farm houses and of course, right along the lake.

Mark and I are going to have to bring our boat to this lake, it is long and narrow with the eastern and western (the long sides) framed with glacially formed mountains. This funneled the wind in a constant strong steady state, there were a number of sailboats gliding across the water.

We stopped and had our lunch on the dam on the southern point of the lake, looking out over the tiny fishermen and swiftly moving sail boats.

Now the second half of the hike, that is a completely different story! Miles and miles of climbing and descending steep paths, up through and old abandoned apple orchard, you can easily see the forest quickly reclaiming the land for their own amidst the precisely spaced and placed apple trees. We went past a fallow field and through an amazingly dense, dark and fragrant stand of pines.

The repeated climbing and descending, primarily the descending was very hard on the knees and by mile 10 of this hike (or about 4 miles of ascending and descending the hillsides) I felt like an old woman. I was starting to hobble, my knees were not at all happy, I’m glad I found such a wonderful walking stick that I had the sense to pick up around mile 5. I still have this walking stick. It is by the coat closet in the front entry way of my house.

At mile 11 we decided just to move to the utility road that was in sight of the trail. We were hoping we would avoid more ups and downs since we did cross this road multiple times already. It was a wise move. We were happier, our knees were happier and we were able to make a bit better time since it started to drizzle at that point.

I loved this hike, despite the achy knees, if I were to traverse this trail again, I would do it in reverse, start with the more challenging side and end with the meandering casual stroll that would be possible on the other side.

I honestly don’t recall where the traditional after hike pie was from, but I know we did not omit the customary diner stop.

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Hiking: New Florence Game Lands

Hike length: 10.5 miles

Suzanne and I started out on this circular trail at 11 am. The first two or three miles of the trail was a near vertical climb interspersed with sharp cut-backs. Once we reached the summit of the mountain we were on it was well worth it, the next 5 miles or so the trail kept along ridge tops with amazing views of our lovely Pennsylvania mountains.

This hike took us along a variety of substrates, anything from the rocky dusty inclines, briefly on a utility dirt road, densely wooded areas where we kept losing the trail markers since the trail was very well trodden and it is September, leaves that have started to fall have masked the placement of the trail. For a mile or so we were along a section of the Laurel Highlands Hiking trail, so the trail blazes were not always the same. There were a number of places where my hiking guide gave very cryptic descriptions of the trail in the un-blazed areas, “after about 1.3 km you’ll turn right at the large maple tree.” We were surrounded by heaps of large maple trees.

We didn’t get back to the start of our loop until 5:30 pm. The six and a half hours reflects some of the navigation difficulty we had in the woods, but it was fine by us. In those six and a half hours we didn’t see another soul for six hours, or about 10 miles, as it was only on the last stretch toward the car when we passed a couple walking their dog.

Just us, our quiet peanut-butter sandwich lunches and a couple of very cool old abandoned charcoal iron furnaces in the woods; we theorized that if we were bears, these old furnaces would make for a great surrogate cave. We convinced ourselves so thoroughly of this that we did not dare approach too close.

We also wanted to start another part of our hiking tradition, not only were we going to seek out nearby, circular trails for day hikes, but we are also going to survey the diners we encounter and sample their pie and coffee. We stopped at Dean’s diner on route 22. A place I’ve passed by dozens of times with Mark on our way to and from Johnstown. We were served absolutely enormous pieces of pie! [Did we finish them, I don’t recall, but I think I had the lemon merenge and Suzanne may have had the coconut cream]

Note: I originally thought this hike was going to be 7 or 8 miles, a good length for one of our first day hikes. We got a good chuckle later realizing that we had already hiked well over eight miles and saw in the notes of my hiking book that the hike was actually 10.5 miles. This was a good trail and I would hike this route again.

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Tuesday: Golden Gate and Muir Woods

Today we stated out with an unusual awakening to find out Martin’s car had been broken into, but the perpetrator had been apprehended and still had his radio; although a small rear door window had been broken. This set back our time schedule a little bit bat all worked out well.

Our two brave adventurers set out again undeterred and set forth toward San Francisco and stopped to do the super touristy Golden Gate Bridge. The view of the Bay, bridge and city was spectacular. We could see Alcatraz mid-bay, with the water as cold as it was I don’t think I would have sanely attempted escape from that small isolated island.

Mark: The amazing thing about the break in was that they didn’t take my camera which was sitting on the floor of the front passenger section. I would have been more upset with the loss of the film than the camera. I�m hoping we captured at least a small percentage of the beauty we have seen.

After the Golden Gate Bridge it was further north to Marin, home of the great mountain bikes, and Muir Woods. Apparently the redwoods of Muir woods are a smaller species that the Giant Sequoias in the Sierra Nevada’s. We’ll have to take their word on it as these were the largest trees I have ever seen.

We picked a small trail loop and hiked through the reserve. Unfortunately the trail was only small on the map and two and a half hours later we were completely worn out. We still managed to enjoy every minute of it. A $5.00 cheese sandwich and some coke tamed the snarling wolverine tucked in Debbie’s shirts, refreshed we headed back to the car, but behind schedule.

Further north near San Rafael, we stopped at a great windsurfing shop. One hour, $500 and lots of wiggling and tugging as we tried on gear, we left with matching wet suits for us both. Unfortunately it was now 4pm and despite a heroic 1 hour drive from Marin to San Jose we ran out of time and energy to windsurf today.

Once we returned and weighed our options with Martin for the evening ahead of us, we ultimately decided to join in on a laser tag game with a bunch of Martin’s coworkers from SGI. $6 per person for about a half and hour of dodging people in a multi-level maze was well worth it. I ended up being fairly well camouflaged wearing all dark colors in an area completely lit from black lights. I beat both Mark and Martin coming in 8th place out of 16 participants. Unlike Mark’s macho charging through the beginning of the game I employed the stake-out-cool-areas strategy which probably saved me from being cremated. This was a first time thing for both Mark and I, we worked up quite a sweat getting a great work out.

Oh yeah, dinner was a quick meal from a burrito place, the burrito was about the size of a football with just about everything in it, yummy, yummy. This place is famous for creating the largest burrito in the Guinness book of world records.

Once we retired for the evening we tried to get some laundry done but ended up sitting up and talking with Martin. Long day with plenty of exercise and we�re beat so we’re going to bed!

[1/30/2004–Note: Muir Woods was the high light of this trip, I wanted to see these huge and aging trees for myself, this is a place I would go to again, or at least I would want to visit another stand of these trees, beautiful, quiet and majestic.]

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