Tadpoles! That means a frog unit study!

We unexpectedly acquired a batch of wood frog spawn so we are now going to work on a unit study on frogs and their life cycle.   Our daughter is watching them closely, noting dates of changes and measuring their growth.  It takes them 50-75 days for them to turn into frogs so she’ll have plenty of time to observe the 14 tadpoles we have, the first of which hatched on March 15.  She’s putting dates and how many days old they are on this sequencing page (which matches her monarch butterfly and chick hatching sequences she also put together from past life cycles she’s studied).

She sat down and reread all the Arnold Lobel “Frog and Toad” stories in an afternoon since she said they fit with our theme and counted for her reading that day.

She made a “transforming frog” craft, we used this pattern but used laminated construction paper and brads so all the legs can fold in and the tail can slide.  So she has had “Cindy the frog” transform before our eyes in a little play.  Hind legs first, then front legs, then she can slowly slide the tail away behind the body as her tadpole changes to frog.

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Seahorses

Jana had fun learning about Seahorses as I put together another interest led unit study.  She explored their habitats, unusual anatomy and behavior and enjoyed beautiful documentaries.  We found some gems of books that went along with our studies:

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Unit Study: Cephalopods

We finished up our primary curriculum and decided to spend a few weeks exploring some topics of my daughter’s choosing before moving on to MBTP 7-9.  She asked for Blue Ringed Octopus and Giant Squid.  So we took a little time to review classification, talked about Mollusks and then Cephalopods in general.  We reread some of our favorites on evolution and adaptation as we reminded ourselves where these organisms fit in the bigger picture.  We explored ocean and coral reef habitats as well.  I found out she loved working through dichotomous keys of made up fish and then working through identifying coral reef fish; and also pretending to be a conservation biologist identifying organisms by phylum, class and order that divers collected and shouldn’t have.  We also added notebooking pages to our big three ringed binder of the animal kingdom for several species that interested her in particular.

Here are some of the books on Cephalopods, including a handful of fun fiction in the mix, that we enjoyed during this unit study:

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We made use of some toilet paper tubes to create some cute models of a blue ringed octopus, giant squid and a blue octopus.

Next up, she wants to learn all about sea horses and investigate composers and classical music.

 

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Curriculum Give Away

The March give away at Secular Homeschool website is for Moving Beyond the Page!  We love this curriculum and we are about to start into our fourth level in another month or so.

 

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Seasonal Books: Summer

The “Books We Love” category will include books we both own or have checked out from our library, that we have found to fit our themes, are fun and have had many re-reading requests. These are by no means complete lists of books we’ve read.

                         

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Butterfly books for kids

Lepidoptera are near and dear to this household.  Our garden is full of native and other flowering plants to attract butterflies.  We rear anything we can find the eggs for.  We’ve also participated in the citizen science of tagging our reared Monarch butterflies.  We have found many great reads for this theme that is so fun revisit every spring and summer.

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Evolution Books for Kids

As a biologist and a secular homeschooler the subject of evolution is an important one that we have been incorporating into as many areas of study as we can. History? Start with the Big Bang and big change over time. Unit studies that my daughter picked out on mudskippers and coat colors of dogs? Fabulous jump off points for discussing natural selection and adaptations and human selection of traits. Fun read alouds? We’ve found plenty! Here are the books we’ve returned to again and again.

          

 

 

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Picture Books About Scientists

We’re on our break from our more structured homeschool curriculum, but that doesn’t mean the learning stops.  We’re busy in the garden with vegetables, fruits and flowering plants where our daughter helps with everything from shoveling compost, planting seeds and seedlings, pulling weeds and watering.  And of course eating the fruits of our labor.  We’re keeping quail this season.  I’ve continued to request piles of related theme books.  Lately, real gems of picture books about scientists

          

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Hatching the Quail

The quail eggs and supplies arrived on April 20th along with the presentation from Homestead Phil.  Data collection commenced right away with recording what the eggs looked like and making prediction as to who would hatch first.  At seven days we were able to begin candling and making further predictions on which eggs were viable, who would hatch first and watching them transform from fluttering tiny shadows to filling most of the egg, recording her observations as she went.

May 5-7, we could hear peeps responding to our whistles from outside the incubator and see the eggs moving on their own as the pips appeared.  May 7 was hatching day, our predicted day!  Six out of our seven eggs hatched successfully.

We weighed the chicks daily for several weeks amazed at how rapidly they grew and changed.  We decided to adopt the chicks as a further adventure for the summer for their eggs and their weeding power in our lawn.  Quail will eat the clover, dandelion and other weeds, leaving the grass alone.

This was a fun addition to our homeschool experience and would recommend Rent The Chicken to anyone interested in pursuing an egg to chick/ bird unit study.   Book list to follow.

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Eggs to Chicks and Birds

In the weeks preceding receiving our Hatch the Quail, we read quite a few books on eggs, birds, chickens and how birds are not the only ones to come from eggs.

 

                 

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Books for Spring!

Books we’ve returned to again and again for our spring season reading:

        

 

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Hatch The Quail

My daughter will be the first one to excitedly tell you, “guess what we’re getting April 20th!?  We’re getting Quails!  When they hatch they are the size of quarters!”

Well, we’re getting seven quail eggs, the incubator, a candle light, a cage and enough feed to care for the hatchlings for a few weeks for a fun spring project.  The company Rent the Chicken also provides a service called “Hatch the Quail” and they will deliver to your home, provide a 30-45 minute presentation, 17 page observation/activity book and pick up the quails after five weeks.  I’m already putting together a unit study for the week(s) prior to and after their arrival on birds, eggs, and raising chickens and quails.  Besides… chicks the size of QUARTERS!

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Panda Unit Study

We have finished our MBTP 5-7 level and wanted to take a break from it before diving into the next level by doing some unit studies of our own.  I asked my daughter what she wanted to learn about and she quickly came up with a list that included mosaics, mudskippers, more french, how we get different breeds of dogs and pandas.  Mudskippers were tricky, there are not many resources for the early elementary years, but put together enough to last the week.  Pandas though, super easy to find resources and great books and hands on projects.

I used some ideas from this Zoo Curriculum packet which had the added bonus of introducing the eight different types of bears and continued on our basic introduction of animal classification we began in our mudskipper week.  If there is something my girl loves to do, it’s sorting.  It’s easy to come up with panda crafts, coloring pages and mapping activities as well as pretending to be pandas.

Books we used ranged from easy readers she read to me (it’s a general practice we have been doing for over a year where she spends about 20 minutes a day reading out loud), fiction story books for fun, Chinese legends of the mountains and pandas, longer read alouds and non-fiction titles.  Our librarian always knows what we’re studying next when we pick up our weekly pile of interlibrary loan materials :)

We also watched National Geographic and BBC Natural World nature shows to cap it off.

    

      

 

    

 

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Moving Beyond the Page Give Away!

We love this curriculum and are about to move into our third level (having completed 4-5 and 5-7).  I have won products from two other give aways from this site before and this is the jack pot of give aways :)

Moving Beyond the Page Curriculum give away!

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Books for the Letter O

Testing out formats.  Should I have a post each for just one letter or should I separate out the subject matter?  There are certainly plenty for Owls as we did a unit on owls, but “O” was also the letter of the week so I included octopus, ostrich…

            

 

    

    

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Book List: Dinosaurs

Books We Love will include books we both own or have checked out from our library that we have found to fit our themes, are fun and have had many re-reading requests. These are by no means complete lists of books we’ve read.

This is just sample book list as I try to figure out what format I want to use.
           

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Seasonal Books: Autumn

Books We Love will include books we both own or have checked out from our library that we have found to fit our themes, are fun and have had many re-reading requests.  These are by no means complete lists of books we’ve read.

This is just sample book list as I try to figure out what format I want to use.

                 

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Book List: Apples

Books We Love will include books we both own or have checked out from our library that we have found to fit our themes, are fun and have had many re-reading requests.  These are by no means complete lists of books we’ve read.

 

This is just sample book list as I try to figure out what format I want to use.

       

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Seasonal Books: Winter

The “Books We Love” category will include books we both own or have checked out from our library, that we have found to fit our themes, are fun and have had many re-reading requests.  These are by no means complete lists of books we’ve read.

Winter category is including topics on snow, hibernation, migration, solstice and seasonal change.

This is just a sample book list as I try to figure out what format I want to use.  Whether I want to include summaries or my review, or have each topic on it’s own page.  But for now, links!

                                   

 

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Book List Anyone?

We’ve been getting into a nice routine with our homeschooling. We are going at our own pace, expanding on topics when there is greater interest. I’m so proud of the work she is doing and the conversations we end up having through the guidance provided by Moving Beyond the Page. Having school outside on the patio and in her “fort” of her swing set on these gorgeous days. We’ve also hit a stride on our phonics and reading, using Explode the Code with Bob Books and other phonics word family books. Math, we are speeding through book A of Singapore Essential Math K, as I know she understands the concepts already, but am using this as part of her writing practice, but she still has fun with all the manipulatives to play with the ideas.

At the beginning of August, I installed the “My Book List” app on my phone as I was looking for a quick way of recording and keeping track of the books we’ve been reading each week. My daughter loves to be read to and is enjoying being an emerging independent reader, taking great pride in reading to visiting Grandparents. We visit our library at least once a week, sometimes more. In addition to just fun books and Jana’s picks, I have been making good use of Inter Library Loan (ILL). For each unit I’ve researched and looked for recommendations for quality literature that relates to the week’s theme, vocabulary or letter sound. Each week we take a large stack of books to return only to leave with an equally large pile of new titles. Well, it’s the end of two months and there are over 225 unique titles on the list! Note, it does not count multiple reading of favorite titles.

As I have found looking to other sources of book lists a great starting point before tumbling into that rabbit hole of reading book reviews and summaries on Amazon, I’m considering creating lists here to share. As we are in week 10, I already have quite a few good reads for the pre-school/kindergarten set. The Book List app conveniently has an export feature which sent my list in chronological order already loaded with the links to Amazon, so that part is easy. It’s just finding the time :) Either it will be many individual posts or just a page with the list and may or may not contain notes from me. Certainly there have been the ones that really stand out that I may provide commentary on.

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Rearing and Releasing Monarch Butterflies

Just in time for our unit on insects, the “Fireflies” unit in Moving Beyond the Page, we have our first reared Monarch butterflies to release this year. This isn’t the first time we’ve done this, she knows the host plant, can spot the eggs and small caterpillars. Jana has, unsurprisingly, been exposed to a number of entomological experiences throughout her life.

As a naturalist, she is a natural. She has a good eye at spotting something new and different. She continually adds to her collection of “treasures” whether it’s a shell, smooth stone, acorn, interesting leaf or feather. She acted as one of the guides when our garden featured on our neighborhood garden tour, identifying plants, flowers and vegetables (much more knowledgeable than a number of our neighbors I might add). She also has a quick hand, strolling down our driveway she snatched an Eight Spotted Forester day flying moth out of the air asking, “what’s this Momma?” That quick hand is also a gentle hand, befriending a Katydid for six or so hours over the course of a day; or playing with a spider in the kiddie pool for over half an hour floating it on boats and letting it climb up and down her arms. Her general lack of fear of wildlife comes into play while fishing with her Dad as well, she has no qualms reeling in, grasping fish and removing hooks on her own, of which she can identify many common species. But I digress as a proud biologist Momma.

So this year with our Monarchs, we’re taking our “citizen science” a step further and participating in a tagging program through Monarch Watch. It’s just a small way to participate in the “bigger picture” with Jana. She’s four and a half. She gets it; although she was a little sad to let the butterflies go (she really wanted to keep them), she knew we have to help take care of “her little buddies.”

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Moving Forward

Wow, almost ten months ago I posted the conclusions I came to about what direction I wanted to go with home schooling.  The Secular, literature based unit studies with hands on projects conclusion.  Well, now we are moving forward with Moving Beyond the Page.  I had been coming back and looking at this “boxed” curriculum several times over the previous months.  It caught my attention with how aligned it was with my philosophies and approach, that the subjects are all integrated; science, social studies, math and language arts all revolve around the weekly theme.  I particularly liked the book selections for the units.  I liked the flexibility the curriculum presents within itself based on your child’s ability and interests.  I decided it would be worth it to pay for pre-packaged organization and supplies for all projects and neatly outlined lesson plans.

14468762884_19f3cccd5a_mWhen the “big box” was delivered, I figured it would take a few weeks to orient myself with the literature and methods.  We would then ease into the lessons before the fall when we would have a more regular schedule.  But as soon as I opened the box, Jana wanted to start right away.  The parent guide is so well prepared, that just a few minutes of prep work at the the beginning of the week to make sure you have all materials on hand and read the lesson of the day ahead of time is all you need to get started.  So we did.

I knew as soon as I set up the first weeks worth of lessons (each unit is set up to do one lesson a day, with five lessons per unit in the 4-5 year old package), that Jana would want to do everything in one sitting.  It’s all fun for her.  She requests to “do school” everyday and we have done two lessons in one sitting because she wants to see what’s next.  She even wanted her school work on the 4th of July, but I convinced her that since we would be at our family picnic (42nd year and running) all day for the holiday, that it was okay to skip a day :)

It’s fun for me too, to just open and go and knowing I am equipped with the tools and have the supplies on hand for dozens of creative ways to teach and for Jana to learn without having to add to my already burgeoning craft supplies. We can easily add to or expand upon units in our own ways as well.  Her library card has been getting a work out finding complementary literature.

I’m excited to see how this goes, I’m confident we have found the right fit for our family.

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5 Q’s For Kids

This week, we’re wondering how our kids think things work.  Maybe giving us a glimpse into how their minds work and how they figure something out.  I needed to expand on the question adding, “what makes it go?”   She has some basic ideas right.  I thought these were particularly fun questions which led to some impromptu lessons where Mark took the clock off the wall to show her what made the “tick tick tick” inside.

How does a clock work? it goes tick tick tick, the tick tick makes it go around

How does a train work?  it goes on the choo choo track, the engine makes it go

How does an airplane fly?   it flies in the skies, the arms of the plane do it

How does a boat work?   paddles make it go, water makes it float, water makes it sink  (a surprisingly profound answer)

How does a television work?   you turn the tv on, I don’t know  (she then went on to say, “we use our phone to paddle when the tv is in the water!” this was the hardest to get across what was meant, tried asking how we get pictures on the screen, …)

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5 Q’s For Kids

linkbuttonnoThis week the theme is about kids.  Jana was fairly quick with her answers.

What is a kid? a little boy  -we asked her, “are you a little boy?”  No.  “are you a kid?”  Yes.  She didn’t extrapolate to little girl.
What’s the best thing about being a kid? snuggles
What’s the hardest thing about being a kid?  you can’t wait
What is something a kid can do but an adult can’t?  play with my friends
How old are you when you stop being a kid?  4, I’m going to be just a girl  -Huh, remarkably similar to Finn :)

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A Peek Into Her Creative Process

My daughter loves to paint.  This is an understatement.  I have hundreds of photos of her using different mediums: finger paints, water colors, tempura, poster paints.   From different approaches: on her belly, at her easel, on a chair or at the table.  With different tools: hands, fingers, brushes, sponges, toothpicks or chopsticks.  And from early ages, starting at about 9 months to just today. I keep her easel set up with access to paints in spill proof cups at all times, which keep the paints fresh for the week as well, so when the mood strikes, she is ready to create! (and no, this is not disastrous, at nearly four she’s never painted anywhere inappropriate – i.e. only on paper, her hands or body.)

In a few years, I plan to put together a photo book of her early works.  I think this is an excellent way to archive the mountain of childhood artwork most parents accumulate and then don’t know what to do with.  I generally take a photo, even if it’s a not so great phone camera photo, of just about everything she paints or draws.  This way, I have the record, but not the clutter, conveniently pre-dated.  Now don’t get me wrong, I’m not so heartless to throw away every precious bit of her creations, because they’re all precious to her:

“Mama? Do you remember that picture, on the blue paper, that I cut up into a puzzle?  Where did it go?”  “I’m sorry Jana, we don’t have those hundreds of bits of paper from three months ago around anymore.”

I have a few choice pieces that I have in an art cabinet frame that houses and displays her work in a way that it makes it so simple to occasionally slide a new “front page” piece in.  I’ll write a date on the back and any comment deemed necessary so that when looking back in chronological order, they can stay that way and oh, yeah, that *is* a jelly fish she drew.

       

 

 

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